Big Ridge State Park

Swimming, boating, camping, hiking, and more. This 3,687-acre park has it all. The park is home to a variety of activities for the whole family. Big Ridge State Park consists of more than 15 miles of hiking trails ranging from easy to very rugged. Among these trails guests hike along dry ridges, lush hollows, old roadbeds, lakeshores and beside cemeteries and remnants of early settlements. The park has 50 campsites on or near Norris Lake to accommodate RV’s, trailers and tent campers. Each site offers amenities such as water, 50-amp electrical hookups and a picnic table with a grill. There is group camp which accommodates up to 120 people with 18 screened-in bunkhouses. Backcountry camping is also available at no charge, but requires a permit.

The park’s recreational activities are not limited to hiking or camping. There is a sandy beach next to Big Ridge Lake which provides swimming enjoyment equipped with a concrete-bottomed area for children. The park also offers sand volleyball, tennis courts, horseshoe pits, a basketball court and a softball field. Big Ridge State Park has a wheelchair accessible playground adjacent to the park office offering play experience for children of all ages and abilities.

Chuck Swan State Forest

Just under 25,000 acres, Chuck Swan State Forest is home to 53 cemeteries, one active church congregation, one firing range (requires a permit purchased from TWRA) and miles of drivable roads. The forest also offers opportunities for hunting, fishing, horseback riding, mountain-biking and caving. Chuck Swan is jointly managed by the Foresty Divison and TWRA.

Please check the hunting schedule before venturing off the state forest roads.

Great Valley Wine Trail

A new wine trail merges moonshine history with award-winning Tennessee wines. Thunder Road Wine Trail is now open and follows the old Thunder Road and Copperhead Road moonshine smuggling routes, winding 140 miles from Knoxville to Butler, Tennessee.

Great Valley Wine Trail represents five wineries in East Tennessee. Our mission is to share our passion for rural Tennessee and Tennessee wines and promote agritourism in Union, Claiborne, Grainger, Cocke, and Johnson counties.

Loyston Point Campground

Located on the shores of Norris Reservoir, Loyston Point Campground and Day-use Area was developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority, which is now operated by Recreation Resource Management. The campground is named for Loyston Point located at point 19 on the reservoir.

This recreational area offers campsites with electrical hook ups, over 17 miles of multi-use trails, a swimming beach with ADAAG accessibility, and the Hemlock Bluff National Recreation Trail along the steep ridges and bluffs of Norris Reservoir.

The campground features sixty-four campsites, 59 with electric hookups. Restrooms with heated showers and flush toilets, dump station, picnic tables, swimming beach, children's playground, canoe/kayak launch ramp and boat ramp.

Tennessee Civil War Trails - Walkers Ford

Trails sign at Hickory Valley Baptist Church
2229 Walkers Ford Road, Maynardville, TN 37807

In late 1863, as Union infantry marched toward Knoxville from the south, Federal cavalry was ordered to support the effort by putting pressure on Confederate Gen. James Longstreet's troops from the north. Longstreet ordered his own cavalry to stop it. The two forces met near here and in a lopsided fight, Union troopers forced the Confederates back to Knoxville.

White Lightning Trail

Get ready for White Lightning - 200 miles of unique American stories told every day through Appalachian arts and crafts, preserved buildings and sites, historic town squares and the tales of legendary characters. The trail gets its name from the area’s history as a prohibition-era, Moonshine-Running Corridor. Rebels careened around the curves of "Thunder Road," transporting illegal, homemade corn whiskey under the cover of darkness. More History-Changing Pioneers made their marks along this route. As you cruise through rolling hills and valleys, you'll be traveling along the path first cut by Daniel Boone himself. You'll walk with the ghosts of Civil War soldiers and coal miners, visit forts that protected the territory's first settlers and see the school where the Clinton 12 stood their ground in the name of civil rights.

And speaking of legends, no Tennessee trip would be complete without a little Musical Heritage. Visit the hometowns of country music's Roy Acuff, Chet Atkins, Kenny Chesney and Carl Smith. Your drive takes you along parts of a National Scenic Byway: East Tennessee Crossing, with unforgettable views from the overlook atop Clinch Mountain. The Beautiful Bodies of Water you'll encounter have shaped the region's landscape and culture for hundreds of years and today attract outdoor enthusiasts of all kinds. So buckle up, there's adventure at every turn on the White Lightning: Thunder Road to Rebels Trail.